Tag Archives: African art exhibition

Top 6 Incredible African Art Exhibitions You Must See Before the End of 2017

It’s easy to forget how lucky we are to receive and share some incredible African art exhibitions happening across cities around the world. How fun is that? Our art calendar is pretty much full this week and for the rest of the year!  But when you lay it out and really see what we have to look forward to, it’s a little overwhelming, isn’t it?  These exhibitions are forward looking, progressive and thought provoking.

Evans Mbugua heads to Gallery of African Art in London. Njideka Akunyili-Crosby‘s stunning art works will be in New Orleans until February 2018. Victor Ehikhamenor explores Benin history through literary at Tyburn gallery and El Natsui will be in Johannesburg as well. I feel a relief for anyone looking for incredible African art exhibitions because surely there’s an exhibition in almost every continent for end of 2017.

This list not only shows the luxury of choice we have to look forward to, but it’s enough to get anyone properly and seriously excited for 2018. From London, Lagos, New Orleans to Johannesburg, check out the top 6 incredible African art exhibitions you should see this week.

EVANS MBUGUA 

DIALOGUE 

1st December 2017 – 27th January 2018

Paris-based Kenyan artist Evans Mbugua returns to the Gallery of African Art (GAFRA) his first solo exhibition in London, DIALOGUE. The art exhibition brings across his latest series of works along with two new installation pieces. What you first notice with Evans Mbugua his how he’s unafraid to use colours. His works are bold and striking “Pop Art” pieces, creating unique print designs (from his graphic design background).

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In this new body of work, Mbuguaexplores ‘Dance’ and the way in which the human body communicates through movement – creating expression, showcasing feelings and inspiring varying degrees of emotion in the observer. The interplay between each dance move creates a “dialogue” – a universal language all individuals can relate to.

“I wanted to create some sort of conversation between their different fields of contemporary dancing through my work. I built this series of works as if it were one contemporary dance performance. I find that through the art pieces, from one body expression to another, a dialogue is created. In painting these contemporaries, I invite the spectator to look at their world in a colourful way.”

 

Omenka Gallery 

‘Dear Nigeria, Dear Friends’

25th November 2017 – 7th December 2017

From November 25 to December 7, 2017, the Literacy Integration and Formal Education (LIFE) Foundation in collaboration with Alliance Française will present Dear Nigeria, Dear Friends, an exhibition of recent works by leading contemporary Nigerian artists Fidelis Odogwu, George Edozie, Alex Nwokolo, Gerry Nnubia, Francis Uduh and Abraham Uyovbisere.

Featuring a diversity of Nigerian art, the exhibition will hold at the Omenka Gallery, Lagos, to fund LIFE Foundation’s literacy projects in Makoko, the economically disadvantaged community on the lagoon beside Yaba, Lagos.

According to founder and president of the LIFE Foundation, Elvira Salleras, “In the last two years, with the invaluable support of sponsors and volunteers, we have executed various projects in that community, including rebuilding a primary school, facilitating 2 medical missions, organising seasonal parties, equipping a school library and distributing books, teaching aids and 1,000 pairs of sandals to school children.”

El Anatsui

Meyina 

25th November – 20th December 2017

Goodman Gallery Johannesburg presents Meyina (meaning ‘I am going’ in Ewe), curated by independent curator and the Director of CCA Lagos Bisi Silva, presents a portrait of El Anatsui by bringing together disparate fragments that form a whole. Alongside seven large-scale sculptural installations, there will be a collection of archival objects on exhibit from Anatsui’s studio, study and library in Nsukka, Nigeria.

This is the first solo exhibition in South Africa of El Anatsui – one of the most influential contemporary artists working today.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK HERE

Lagos Photo festival

“Regimes of Truth”: The 8th Edition of LagosPhoto Festival

24th November – 15th December 2017

Renowned British-Nigerian fashion designer and art collector Duro Olowu is curating the 8th edition of the Lagos Photo festival. This is a big deal if you have any idea how Duro Olowu has wooed the world with his prints and patterns. Themed Regimes of Truth, this edition explores the pursuit for and presentation of truth in contemporary society, gleaning inspiration from the writings of some of the 19th and 20th centuries’ most influential literary realists and intellectuals.

Lagos photo 2_Duro Olowu_TheGlowingColours

From the curator’s statement:

“The 2017 edition of LagosPhoto Festival calls to reflect on these regimes of truths and beliefs, and the fading relevance of the quest for reality in our time. Contemporary photography is the new repository of the fading quest for reality, not by virtue of its supposed freedom, but because it embodies the synthesis and unmasks the contradictions of the knowledge society and its imperative for creativity. It is our point of interdependence and the most democratic tool for social engagement today in the sense that almost everyone can make pictures and share using smart phones.”

LagosPhoto 2017 Artists include:
Lubabetu Abubakar (Nigeria)
James Barnor (Ghana)

Joana Choumali (Ivory Coast)
Kadara Enyeasi (Nigeria)
Samuel Fosso (Cameroon)
Hassan Hajjaj (Morocco/UK)
Nicola Lo Calzo (Italy)
Bas Losekoot (Netherlands)
Mohau Modisakeng (South Africa)
Zanele Muholi (South Africa)
Marilyn Nance (USA)
Jackie Nickerson (USA)
Logor (Nigeria)
Ruth Ossai (Nigeria)
Leonce Raphael Agbodgelou (Benin)
Tabiso Sekgala (South Africa)
Daniele Tamagni (Italy)
Stephen Tayo (Nigeria)

Osaretin Ugiagbe (Nigeria/USA) Giya
Makondo-Wills (UK/South Africa)
Amina Zoubir (France/Algeria)
Liz Johnson Artur (Russia/Ghana)

We’re in for a treat with these incredible African art exhibitions

Save the Date – Lagos Photo 2017 :24th November – 15th December 2017

Victor Ehikhamenor

IN THE KINGDOM OF THIS WORLD

24th November 2017 – 20th January 2018

We’ve seen some images from the opening of “In the Kingdom of this World” and it’s a must see.The exhibition draws its title from a work of historical fiction by Cuban novelist Alejo Carpentier, who suggested that “man finds his greatness, his fullest measure, only in The Kingdom of This World.” The novel uses Carpentier’s distinctive mode of “marvellous realism” to explore colonial and post-colonial history through the prism of different cultural perspectives, challenging the boundary between reality and narrative.

Ehikhamenor’s new work considers themes of colonial and religious hierarchies and the interaction of people, palace and society across the intersecting histories of the Benin Kingdom and the British Empire. As in Carpentier’s novel, the official history and its supposed reality is subverted by the outlandish and the surreal. The exhibition is now open at Tyburn gallery London.

 

Njideka Akunyili Crosby

PROSPECT.4: THE LOTUS IN SPITE OF THE SWAMP

18th NOVEMBER 2017 – 25th FEBRUARY 2018

Prospect.4, is a citywide exhibition that opens November 16-19, 2017 in New Orleans. There are so many reasons why you should know about Njideka Akunyili-Crosby – surreal! You can also find her works across the world in the following hot spots:

  • Prospect.4, New Orleans, from 18 Nov
  • Predecessors, Tang Teaching Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY, until 30 Dec
  • Counterparts, Baltimore Museum of Art, until 18 MarchNjideka Akunyili Crosby_Prospect_TheGlowingColours

Tyburn Gallery Presents Untitled , A Summer Group Exhibition 19 July –  15 September 2016

SUMMER GROUP EXHIBITION: Untitled

19 July –  15 September 2016

 

We haven’t noticed many group exhibitions amongst African artists this year. Obviously aside of Nigeria in Venice group show at the Biennale, we’re set to visit Tyburn gallery for their new showcase.

Tyburn Gallery is presenting a new group show UNTITLED. This particular exhibition will see the works of Joël Andrianomearisoa, Edson Chagas, Victor Ehikhamenor, Mouna Karray and Mónica de Miranda in the London gallery.

From the press release describes the summer group show as follows:

The show pairs photographic work with sculptural paper pieces, to create a vision of desolation and minimalism, a nameless, placeless space of slow urban decay and shifting history. This sense of blankness quietly strips bare the grand guiding narratives of history to reveal whispers of disappointment – an unnamed unease which pervades the present moment.

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Mónica de Miranda
Hotel Globo, 2016
inkjet print
49 x 74 cm
Copyright the artist, Courtesy Tyburn Gallery

We find paper and textiles as recurrent elements in Joël Andrianomeariso’s work. The artist was born in Madagascar and lives and works between Antananarivo (Madagascar) and Paris (France). Split, folded, creased and woven, Andrianomeariso is able to create a myriad of compositions from his materials. In Passion Labyrinth (2014), Andrianomearisoa creates a three-line grid of fragile folded black paper. The different folds of the paper overlap, blend and contrast, creating a fluid enquiry into the notions of fantasy and reality, emotion and truth. The varied textures and monochrome, repetitive nature of the work invoke a multitude of meanings and emotions.

Edson Chagasphoto series Found Not Taken (2009) on the other hand explores physical and cultural displacement by documenting the everyday objects of Luanda, where the artist was born and currently lives. The work arises from Chagas’ interest in the emergent culture of disposability and his hometown’s developing consumerism in the face of economic advancement.

 

Hailing from the historic seat of the Benin Empire, Victor Ehikhamenor draws inspiration from the dual aesthetic and spiritual traditions which infused his upbringing, using imagery and symbolism from both Edo traditional religion and Catholicism. As an avid storyteller The Palace Singer as a Historian (2017), reflect between magic realism of memory and nostalgia or biting criticism of history and politics with a huge nod to the political issues in Nigeria both contemporary and historical. The artist was born in Edo State, Nigeria in 1970 and lives and works between Lagos, Nigeria and Maryland, USA.

In the series Murmurer (2007), Mouna Karray photographs walls – abandoned architectural barriers that increasingly characterize the cityscape of her hometown Sfax, Tunisia. Karray’s work documents the reality of urban neglect. In the artist’s words: “From the beginning I was fascinated by the stories the walls seemed to whisper to me. Some of them have been subject to alterations over time. […] The traces of time mark them like scars.  It is their status as faulty that suits me”.

 

Mónica de Miranda’s series Hotel Globo (2016) features an Angolan hotel built in the 1950s. Rich in history and once considered the best in Luanda, de Miranda’s photographs capture a place stuck in time, reflecting the contrasts that define the city itself. Hotel Globo is a meditation on the need to preserve places as symbols of the construction of collective memory. The work also stresses the urgent need to rethink models of development and for these models to address the relationship with the past.

 

De Miranda’s other work includes Linetrap (2014). Here she explores how colonised lands were frequently defined and divided by dominating powers that imposed artificial limits and boundaries. The artist uses a line to rework a fixed and unique landscape, by stitching over the images.

Exhibition Facts

 

Artists:                         Joël Andrianomearisao, Edson Chagas,

Victor Ehikhamenor, Mouna Karray, Mónica de Miranda

Title:                            UNTITLED

Address:                       Tyburn Gallery, 26 Barrett Street, London, W1U 1BG

Telephone:                   +44 (0)20 3388 0540

Website:                       www.tyburngallery.com

Email:                           info@tyburngallery.com

Dates:                          19 July – 15 September 2017

Opening Hours:            Tuesday – Friday, 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 12 – 5PM

Admission:                   Free

Nearest Tube:               Bond Street

For info contact:            Emma Gilhooly or Francesca Meale at Pelham Communications

emma@pelhamcommunications.com

francesca@pelhamcommunications.com

+44 (0)20 8969 3959

 

Johannesburg to Lagos: Upcoming African Art Exhibitions Summer 2017 [Part 1]

We love June so much. Not just for the lasting sunshine but for the incredible African art exhibitions happening around the globe. Whether you an African art dealer, enthusiast, gallery owner or even an artist, you can’t afford to miss this.

From modern and fancy, to classical and serene, we’ve got your next art outing sorted.

Here are our picks of highly anticipated art exhibitions at Africa’s leading art galleries that you must not miss:

HANK WILLIS THOMAS

ADS IMITATE LIFE

Exhibitions in June-TheGlowingColours-2017
EXHIBITION OPENING AT GOODMAN GALLERY CAPE TOWN
10 June – 1 July 2017

In The Rhetoric of the Image, Roland Barthes defines the advertising image as the most ‘intentional’ kind of image. Indeed, the messages behind adverts are direct and unambiguous to achieve their – supposedly – singular aim: selling the product.

Hank Willis Thomas is a photo conceptual artist who works with themes related to identity, history and popular culture. He joined Goodman Gallery in 2010 and has been exhibiting with the gallery since then.

You can’t deny the role of advertisements in our society. From influencing what we eat, wear, think, drink, dream and what we buy. While the tole of advertisers have sort of evolved drastically thanks to social media and analytics, this art exhibition sheds light on the role of black men in adverts.

 

 

 

In Ads Imitate Life, I expose the backward attitudes that continue to pervade American advertising, undermining the neat narrative of ‘progress’ that countries like the US hold dear.

– Hank Willis Thomas

Ads Imitate Life features work from three celebrated series by Hank Willis Thomas, titled: Branded, Unbranded: Reflections in Black Corporate America and Unbranded White Woman, allowing for an in-depth investigation into the visual language strategies of advertising and the cultural stereotypes in which they are rooted.

 

TITI OMOIGHE

MODERN INTERPRETATIONS

EXHIBITION OPENING AT TEMPLE MUSE

June 3 – August 30, 2017

Get the feeling that this would be a  good exhibition? Indeed we trust Temple Muse to deliver.

In a rare glimpse into her world, Titi Omoighe showcases the inner workings of her mind with 34 paintings in Modern Interpretations.

Omoighe’s works can be split in three main themes. Recent Works that show her ability to take risks and exploration of new techniques and subjects. The Hunter Series which is inspired by D.O. Fagunwa’s book “Ogboju Ode ninu Igbo Irunmale”, translated into English by Wole Soyinka as ‘Forest of a Thousand Daemons’. The final theme, Tradition & Culture focuses on the way of life of the African people, while also exploring the indigenous and focusing on different groups, values and cultures.

 

GARY STEPHENS

PLEATED

Art Exhibitions in June-TheGlowingColours-2017

This centre of this subject is hair – just you know. Gary Stephens is taking his talent to Johannesburg to showcase his works on African traditional hair-braiding. It doesn’t end there, the US born artist is also bringing hats, headscarves and contemporary urban style to Everard Gallery.

The first time we saw an exhibition focusing on hair was by the prolific Nigerian photographer J.D ‘Okhai Ojeikere. This was at the Venice Biennale a couple of years ago.

Stephens portrays women in head scarves or men wearing caps to focus attention on the power of these “everyday” symbols of African life.

The drawings capturing a view from behind, focus on the iconic power of a subject’s hair or hat instead of their specific facial features.

From a visual perspective, he is constantly drawn to patterns and visual rhythms, such as geometric repetitions, textile patterns, or botanical shapes.

If you’re in Johannesburg, go over to Everard and support this art exhibition. You don’t get to see ornate hairstyles and headdresses everyday.

Address: Everard Read / CIRCA Johannesburg 2 & 6 Jellicoe Avenue Johannesburg, 2196

Email: gallery@everard.co.za

African Art Guide: Gallery of African Art London Opens My Roots by Marie-Geneviève Morin

The Gallery Of African Art (GAFRA) opened its doors to guests for the preview of art exhibition by artist M. As we entered into the gallery in Mayfair, London on Thursday evening, we caught the feeling that something great just happened. The artist M, whose full name is Marie-Geneviève Morin, was also present at the grand opening. A splash of colourful art works perfectly displayed on the first floor. On the basement, the artist had huge black nylon bag painted with the same glowing colours that characterised her works placed on the pedestals. Some art works were also found on the ceiling and some eye catching painted vinyl-like art works lined up on the wall.

Marie-Geneviève Morin-GalleryofAfricanArt

Marie-Geneviève Morin is unique. She started her artistic journey over 3 years ago and has produced an array of works that are breathtaking and captures her state of mind. She is recognised for her intense, raw and passionate style of working with multi-media materials.

Gallery of African Art London, which opened in 2013 predominantly exhibits 20th-century and Contemporary Art from the African region and its Diaspora. M is Canadian and has Haitian heritage. She mentioned in the opening that she has a deep desire to discover her roots. GAFRA commented that her works are particularly unique and the inspiration behind her works are so touching that she had to be showcased without a doubt.

breaks with conventional rules, instructions and expectations by being unplanned, unstudied and unapologetic. Working mainly in large format, she attacks the canvas with a visceral process she calls “trashing” and uses her hand as a palette board. Each of M’s paintings represents the time, physical space and mood she inhabits in the moment, as opposed to offering interpretations or commentary of the world she lives in. As such, the characters, icons and messages that appear on the canvas harness her channelled energy and emotional state of mind. M’s work is deeply personal; it represents her quest to further understand her heritage, discover her identity and pay homage to her Haitian roots.

The Gallery Of African Art (GAFRAwill show the exhibition from 12th May – 17th June 2017.

 

Visitor Information

Opening times: Monday – Friday, 10am-6pm | Saturday, 11am-5pm

Admission: FREE

Address: Gallery of African Art (GAFRA), 45 Albemarle Street, London W1S 4JL

Nearest Underground Station: Green Park (Jubilee, Piccadilly and Victoria lines)

From Our Instagram Feed: My Roots by Marie-Geneviève Morin

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Instagram: @theglowingcolours

Twitter: @glowingcolours

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theglowingcolours

Moffat Takadiwa: Say Hello to English at Tyburn Gallery London

Award-winning artist Moffat Takadiwa is back to London-based art gallery Tyburn gallery for a new exhibition. Say Hello to English, is Takadiwa’s second art exhibition.

Born in Karoi, Zimbabwe, in 1983, and currently based in Harare, Takadiwa is known for his intricate wall sculptures and installations made from found materials, including spray-can debris, bottle tops and computer keyboard pieces. Takadiwa’s practice engages issues of material culture, spirituality, colonialism and identity, as well the environment.

MoffatTokadiwa-SayhellotoEnglish-TheGlowingColours-April2017 (1)

Say Hello to English touches a very interesting fact that Zimbabweans and Africans in general happen to speak English as a result of the British colonization and education. This has created a sort of English-speaking elite, while indigenous and native cultures are growing more and more out of use.

The art exhibition sees as inspiration the work of Kenyan writer Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o. In his book ‘Decolonising the mind’, the author highlights the inseparable connection between language and culture, therefore between language and cultural dominance.

The exhibition consists of wall sculptures made from destroyed computer keyboards, through which the artist explores the legacy of this cultural imperialism perpetuated by language. For Takadiwa, language not only carries culture, but also embodies the values by which people perceive their place in the world.

 

Moffat Takadiwa is a graduated of Harare Polytechnic College, Zimbabwe in 2008. He belongs a school of the post-independence generation of artists in Zimbabwe.

Takadiwa has exhibited extensively across major institutions in Zimbabwe as well as internationally (USA, Europe and Asia).

MoffatTokadiwa-SayhellotoEnglish-TheGlowingColours-April2017 (1)

This should be a thought-provoking exhibition that will question our perception of native and English languages in the African context. Some of us have been guilty to some extent of not appreciating our native languages with fear of being perceived as ‘local’. Well here’s an exhibition that will inspire you to see things from a different lens. We will definitely be going to have a look!

 

Exhibition Facts

Artist:                           Moffat Takadiwa

Title:                            Say Hello to English

Address:                      Tyburn Gallery, 26 Barrett Street, London, W1U 1BG

Telephone:                  +44 (0)20 3388 0540

Website:                      www.tyburngallery.com

Email:                           info@tyburngallery.com

Dates:                          17 March – 6 May 2017

Private View:                Thursday 16 March 2017, 6-8.30PM

Opening Hours:           Tuesday – Friday, 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 10AM – 5PM

Admission:                   Free

Nearest Tube:              Bond Street

For information please contact: info@tyburngallery.com

Click here to buy Decolonising the Mind: Amazon

Jack Shainman Gallery Presents 2 Solo Exhibitions of Meleko Mokgosi

Jack Shainman Gallery has announced that it will be be dedicating two solo exhibitions that will feature new work by artist Meleko Mokgosi. The first exhibition “Comrades II” will be open at 24th Street gallery while “Lerato” is on view at the gallery’s 20th Street location. Both are distinct chapters from Democratic Intuition (2014-present), a body of work initially exhibited at the ICA Boston in 2015. “Comrades II” continues Mokgosi’s examination of the historical, aesthetic and conceptual links between southern African liberation movements and communism, while “Lerato” is centered on the concepts of allegory and lerato, the Setswana word that roughly translates as “love.” The art exhibition will be accompanied by written text with imagery in a series of large-scale paintings.

TheGlowingColours-Meleko Mokgosi-JackShainman-Art

Art Exhibition Details:

In Democratic Intuition the artist poses questions about how one can approach ideas of the democratic, founded on the simultaneous recognition of alterity and ipseity, in relation to the daily-lived experiences of the subjects that occupy southern Africa. Together, these chapters seek to uncover the manner in which individuals invest intense emotional energy into others and objects and how these investments play out in relation to the democratic.

In “Comrades II”, Mokgosi pays close attention to the ways in which language was used to articulate the fight for freedom and questions how the idea of democracy continues to shape the current state of citizens’ experience and reciprocation of democracy. The exhibition’s title engages the term “comrade,” with its political resonance and implication of egalitarianism, supposedly cutting across gender, racial, ethnic, and class lines. In southern African liberation movements and politics, comrade was specifically used to refer to members of particular parties. In the context of this exhibition, Mokgosi employs the term to complicate its supposed equalizing force.

“Lerato”, produced over a two-year period, was developed around ideas of allegory and lerato (love) and inspired by William-Adolphe Bouguereau‘s paintings as a compositional case study. Mokgosi’s impetus was to experiment with visual and narrative strategies that did not depend on sequential expectations. For Mokgosi, a viewer cannot help but be cognizant of the method of reading and interpretation at the moment he or she begins to engage with any allegorical narrative (whether visual or textual). As a “narrative whose outward appearance is contrived to suggest a hidden meaning” – allegories always involve a re-writing or re-imagining of preexisting texts. Added to this inquiry, and perhaps more importantly, is the unacknowledged fact that William-Adolphe Bouguereau produced paintings, such as The Motherland (1883), during the Scramble for Africa at the turn of the 20th century. Mokgosi expands even more his perspective as to how the grand narratives of history can be unsettled through the concept of historicity:

Broadly speaking, historicity strategically argues that history is not something that happens, but as something that unfolds in different directions yet folds the subject into these multiple directions. History, then, is not an event or collections of events, but rather a number of “unfoldings” that bear the mark of things before. So I tend to think of history as something that is always already present. And language plays a key part too, which is why I did not want to translate the word lerato. My reservation about translation has to do with the fact that translation—as a process that tries to close the gap between two languages—is based on Western conventions (here anthropological, there ethnographic) of reality, representation and knowledge. Beyond these old politics within history, the words love and lerato differ in that the Setswana word is commonly used as a proper noun for women. The same cannot be said for the word love, which although poetic, is limited to every other world except for the one in which it can be used daily as a proper noun to summon a mother’s child.  Lerato is compelling to me because it is not an abstract and poetic concept that is supposedly opaque and fleeting, but rather it is as concrete as any human subject. Meleko Mokgosi

The Jack Shainman gallery exhibition will be open until October 22 2016.

Meleko Mokgosi
Lerato and Comrades II
Date:  8 – October 22, 2016  

Address: 513 W 20th St, New York, NY 10011, United States

 

Enigma Art Collective Presents Colourism Exhibition

Enigma-Art-colourism-Abuja-Exhibition

Abuja art scene is becoming more and more vibrant with new art exhibitions opening in select locations.

Pop up gallery, Enigma Art Collective presents COLOUR.ISM, an exhibition set to open on April 28th, which brings on the centre stage, the problems of colour and identity.

According to the organisers, the meaning of COLOUR.ISM is the discrimination of human beings based on their skin colour and pigment. This exhibition looks at the lives of those human beings in our society who live without skin pigmentation- Albinos.

COLOUR.ISM evolved from a thirst to give a voice to the dismissed, presenting a stage for dialogue. By focusing our creative energy on moulding a social commentary with our audience, we gave this exhibition the content to create an emotional and ethereal experience.

For more info about the exhibition, visit www.cargocollective/enigmaart

Events! Tyburn Gallery Presents Michele Mathison: Uproot | 5 February – 19 March 2016

Michele Mathison is set to showcase latest works at London’s Tyburn Gallery in February.

The South African-born artist uses various materials to transform everyday objects into powerful artistic declarations. Informed by his own migratory experience, living primarily in South Africa and Zimbabwe, his sculptures and installations form a visual language commenting on both the personal and political.

This exhibition brings together tools, objects and symbols that shape cultural and political identity in South Africa and Zimbabwe. The art showcase aims to form a conversation on themes of labour and migration, a visual narrative of Sub-Saharan Africa’s collective concerns.

Find an excerpt of the press release and info below:

michele-Mathison-art-SouthAfrica-Tyburn-TheGlowingColours

In Plot, maize plants intricately crafted in steel form a visual field in the gallery. As the staple food of the region, small plots of land planted with maize are a regular sight in rural and urban surroundings. Placed out of context and devoid of function, the inherent monumentality of the crop is revealed, intensified by the ornateness of the sculpture and hardness of the metal used; it is at once an inviting image of domestic survival and a definitive, if decorative, boundary within the space. The work becomes a sculptural expression for universal concerns such as migration, land ownership and cultivation, whilst providing a metaphor for the cycle of life.

michele-Mathison-art-SouthAfrica-Tyburn

Archetypal stone-carved Zimbabwe birds in the series Chapungu, Shiri yedenga (sky bird) are reinterpreted in cast iron and placed on wooden gum poles providing a modern day perch. Emblematic of the country’s history and identity, the birds are layered with political and spiritual connotations.

Originally created by the Shona people for the walled city of Great Zimbabwe, during the 13th and 14th centuries, it is believed that the birds were used to communicate with ancestral spirits, the cornerstone of Shona religious belief. The carvings were removed by British colonisers and treasure hunters during the later part of the 19th century. Under the patronage of colonialist Cecil John Rhodes, several of the birds were taken to South Africa – only to be repatriated to Zimbabwe following independence in 1980. Rhodes himself tried to use the birds as evidence of some kind of Phoenician or Egyptian pre-colonisation.

The works become not solely a comment on movement across cultural and national borders, but also the manipulation of patriotic and personal identity by the physical, often brutal, uprooting and repatriation of historical symbols.

The exhibition also includes a wall-relief work, Lost ground, which recalls the beginnings of cultivation, or destruction and construction. This once again references how the artist plays between ideas of nurture and growth, whilst reminding us of the violence often associated with the appropriation of a country’s mineral resources.

Born in South Africa, Michele Mathison lived in Italy and Mozambique before spending most of his childhood in Zimbabwe. He studied at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town, South Africa (1997-2000) and spent the following years living between Cape Town, Harare and Bulawayo, before moving to Johannesburg where he now lives and works.

 

Michele Mathison has done solo shows as well as group exhibitions which include: Broken English, Tyburn Gallery, London (2015); You Love Me, You Love Me Not, Municipal Gallery, Almeida Garrett, Porto (2015); African Odysseys, Brass, Brussels (2015); Nirox Sculpture, Nirox Sculpture Park, Johannesburg, (2014) and Dudziro, Zimbabwe Pavilion, 55th Venice Biennale, Venice (2013). His work is included in the collection of Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA).

Exhibition Info

Title:                            Michele Mathison

Address:                      Tyburn Gallery, 26 Barrett Street, London, W1U 1BG

Telephone:                  +44 (0)20 3388 0540

Website:                      www.tyburngallery.com

Dates:                          5 February – 19 March 2016

Private View:                Thursday 4 February 2016, 6 – 8PM

Opening Hours:           Tuesday – Friday, 10AM – 6PM, Saturday 10AM – 5PM

Admission:                   Free

Nearest Tube:              Bond Street

 

For information please contact: info@tyburngallery.com

African Art Guide Italy: Adejoke Tugbiyele in Florence

A new African art exhibition in Florence features the works of distinguished artist Adejoke Tugbiyele. The exhibition is titled ReSignifications and currently on display at New York university’s Villa La Pietra in Florence, Italy until November 2015. ReSignifications is curated by Nigerian scholar and NYU Professor of Drama and Africana Studies Awam Amkpa in conjunction with the conference Black Portraitures. 

Adejoke Tugbiyele-African-art-exhibition-TheGlowingColoursThe exhibition brings together established and emerging artists from around the world to engage critically with historical and contemporary representations and objectifications of black bodies. The artists on display include Adejoke Tugbiyele – Awol Erizku – Chriss Aghana Nwobu – Damien Davis – Delphine Diaw Diallo – Delphine Fawundu – Derrick Maddox – Elizabeth Colomba – Flavio Cerquera – Hassan Hajjaj – In-Flux – Joanne Savio – Justin Randolph Thompson – Kiluanji Kia Henda – Laylah Amatullah Barrayn – Lyle Ashton Harris – Malik Nejmi – Mario Macilau – Nashormeh Lindo – Nora Chipaumire and Ananya Chatterjee – Riccardo Cavallari – Russell Watson – Sara Shamsavari – Shantrelle P.Lewis.

Adejoke Tugbiyele-African-art-exhibition-TheGlowingColoursAdejoke Tugbiyele‘s work was also recently shown at the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair in London, and on the exhibition A River Depends on it Tributaries, curated by Jeanne Brasile, at Seton Hall University’s Walsh Gallery in New Jersey.

 

 

Photos! The Art Pop-Up Show Hosted By IAMISIGO

IAMISIGO kicked off its ‘Art Installation’ series at its showroom on Sunday 27th of September. The event was aimed at enlightening consumers about emerging art talent fostering the brand’s love for the arts.

“The Art Pop-Up Show” is a celebration of Pop Culture. IAMISIGO will continue to partner with artists to provide a unique experience for the art installation series.

The maiden edition showcased works from; Dennis Osadebe, Yagazie Emezi, Chris Okoigun, Kasen, Tunde Alara and Addie Mak.

The event was sponsored by Simply Green.

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All images: LSF PR